The Benefits of Slow Parenting

It’s too easy to get caught up in the trap of busyness and lose track of what is important. We really like this slow parenting movement which calls for families to simplify their life and be present with each other.

John Duffy, a clinical psychologist and author of “The Available Parent”, advises parents how to start slow parenting.

I encourage parents to take some time to just watch their children, whether they are playing, doing homework, or eating a snack. Take a moment to drink them in. Remember and remind yourself how remarkable your children are. That pause alone, even if momentary, can drive a shift in the pace.

Slow parenting is good for young brains too!

Doing too much can be draining on adults, but it can be debilitating for kids whose brains are still developing.“In early development, kids are still wiring. They need to have moments of doing and moments of being for integration to happen,” says Contey (Carrie Contey, cofounder of Slow Family Living). “If they don’t take space for integration that leads to meltdowns and overtiredness. Kids then think they’re not good at school or a certain sport, when that’s not the fact but the byproduct of being overdone.”

Read the full article on Slow Parenting here.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Vision: A Learned Skill

In this issue we look at ocular motor control, how it impacts reading and what can contribute to ocular motor difficulties.

Guide to Safe & Sound Protocol

In this insightful interview, Dr Stephen Porges explains how the Safe And Sound Protocol promotes calming and social engagement and provides a summary of his Polyvagal Theory . Dr Porges provides key tips for parents whose children are doing...

ADHD: The Patchy Attention System

The vast amount of research into ADHD and brain function has resulted in ever greater insight into the intricacies and complexities of this condition. Our current understanding of ADHD is that it stems from a malfunction of the brain’s attention system...